My short wrap weaving instructions

My short wrap weaving instructions

Melissa Woodruff of the Facebook group Sewing for Weavers has asked about this wrap since I posted a photo of it on the group.  This is a short version of my favorite garment– a much longer wrap.  I didn’t have enough of the lovely weft yarn so decided to create a somewhat different look with a shorter warp and with fancy yarn woven into the front.

This is a “low-sew” project– only three straight seams all on selvedges, so no special treatment needed.  You can see the center back seam in the photo.  There are two side seams that aren’t visible making sleeves.  The neckline is shaped on the loom and it and the hem edges are finished with crochet.  I would have hemmed the bottom but didn’t have sufficient yarn to make it long enough.  This is a “one-size-fits-most” garment.

I used a ramie/cotton green yarn rescued from unraveling a thrift store sweater for the warp, sett at 8 epi, width in reed 23″.   (I normally make my longer wraps at least 24″ and preferably wider, but again, lack of weft yarn dictated a narrower warp.)  The main weft is Filatura di Crosa “Cambridge”, a wool/mohair blend with a nylon binder.  The accent weft is “La Bohème,” which had several colors.  I was disappointed to find it was composed of  approx. 5 yard lengths of different yarns simply knotted together, so I cut it apart to use the kind of teal-bluish color only.  The clasp is an Art Deco antique I bought at a show a long time ago.

Here is the crudely-drawn, not to scale, weaving plan.  It is woven as two 44″ rectangles (all measurements are on-loom).  Draw a full-size cartoon for the decorative area that shouldn’t be wider than 4″  (mine was a simple stair step).  I make my cartoons on scrap fabric or on interfacing because paper tends to rip loose when you beat. Begin at the top of the diagram. (You can also weave this from the bottom up, just reversing the inches marks.)  This is plain weave, and with all wools I don’t really beat the weft, but gently snug it in so the garments feel light and airy.

short wrap weave plan

If you start weaving at the top, weave for 20″, then begin to weave the neck opening by using the main weft up to 4″ from the right selvedge, and use a second small shuttle or butterfly to weave in waste yarn or other spacer material from the selvedge to the 4″ mark.  Keep weaving the neck area for 4″ (you are now at inch 24 in your weaving).  Pin your cartoon for the inset accent design to the waste yarn area, weave 1 pick of main weft across from left to right selvedge and back to left selvedge.  Wind a second shuttle with the accent weft and begin weaving it from the right selvedge to meet the main weft coming from the left.  When the wefts meet, wrap the around, open the next shed, and return to the selvedges. Advance the cartoon as you weave.   Continue until you have woven the whole 44″ back/front piece.  Weave a line of waste yarn and start over doing the next piece, only making the neck at the left selvedge.

Remove from the loom, machine stitch around the edge of the neck opening, and remove the waste yarn and unused warps from that area.  Machine zig-zag the edges again.  Do the same for the hem edges and for the dividing line between the two rectangles and cut them apart.  Wet finish.  Sew the backs together at the center seam.  Fold at the shoulder line and leave an opening of 10″ from the fold.  Sew the side seams from there to the hem.  You can make the garment rectangles 4″ longer and allow for a turned-under hem, or you can encase the raw edges with crochet or with bias binding.

Let me know if you have questions and what you think of the wrap!  Happy weaving.

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Beginning Weaving Classes Announced

Beginning Weaving Classes Announced

 I am excited to tell you that I am planning two sections of beginning weaving classes.  The first will meet Feb. 27-28 and Mar. 5, the second Mar. 18-19 and Apr. 2.  You don’t need any experience with weaving at all, but the class is also good for those who once wove but have forgotten how.  You don’t need any special equipment as I will provide looms and other tools.
These classes will meet at my home studio in Sunrise Beach, MO.  On the Saturday, we will meet from 9:00 am to about 4:00 pm.  You will learn how weaving works, the parts of a basic loom, how to plan how much yarn you need for a project, and how to wind a warp for your loom.  On Sunday, we will meet for brunch at 11:30, then learn how to set up the loom for weaving and how to weave.  We should be done by about 4:00, and you will take your loom home to weave a scarf.  The last Saturday, we will meet from 9:00 to about 2:00.  You will learn how to finish the weaving, remove it from the loom, and wet-finish your project.  We will discuss further options for you to continue exploring weaving.  I will provide lunch both Saturdays and brunch on Sunday.
For those who don’t know me, I am an accredited weaver with the Certificate of Excellence from the Handweavers’ Guild of America.  I have been weaving since 1992, and have exhibited my work in shows and galleries in Iowa and Missouri.  I am now a retired college professor (French and Women’s Studies) with over 40 years of teaching experience.  Believe me, teaching French verbs to adolescents is excellent training in patience!  Since retiring, I have taught a number of classes and workshops, including beginning and advanced weaving.  I am a member of the Lake Area Fiber Artists and Missouri Fiber Artists groups.  I love weaving and I love teaching others how to weave!
Tuition includes warp yarn, meals described above, use of my looms, extensive handouts, and purchase of weft yarns at cost.  Tuition is $180 for the three-day class, and I am happy to make an affordable payment plan for your convenience.  Classes are limited to a maximum of three people.
Please reply to this e-mail to tell me which class you want to take, or that this is not a good time but you would be interested later, or that you would like me to remove your name from my list of potential beginning weavers.  You can e-mail me or call my at (573) 374-1063 if you have any questions.  Thank you and have a great day!
Diane Crowder
liebcrow@earthlink.net
New Hand Weaving Blog

New Hand Weaving Blog

I am new to blogging and suspect I will make a lot of mistakes!  I don’t plan to post very often, but I do want to share some of the things I have learned over more than 20 years of weaving.  As you can see from my “About” page, I am a retired college professor now weaving full time.  I passed the examination for the Handweavers’ Guild of America’s Certificate of Excellence in Weaving in 2012.  This self-taught rigorous exam took 4 years of research and 40 weavings in every kind of structure.  I have done several presentations to my local guild, as well as teaching classes here in central Missouri.

My plan for the blog is to post two kinds of things.  One will be my presentations on topics such as using thrums (loom waste), reading drafts, making low-sew handwoven clothing, and more.  The other will be examples of my weavings with comments on techniques, weave structures, loom shaped clothing, etc.  My hope is to share what I have learned, to inspire newer weavers, and spark sharing of ideas through your comments.

The photo above is an old one showing a ruana in both handspun and commercial yarns.  I made it when I lived in Iowa, where the warmth was very welcome in winter!

I hope to post one of my presentations soon, so check back often.  Thank you.

Diane

Welcome!

Please click on the Diane Crowder Designs/Crane Cove Creations link to go to my home page. See “About” for a short bio.  I hope you will enjoy my weaving and fiber art creations.  To visit my Etsy shop for finished products, please click on the Crane Cove Creations link at the right.  I plan to post occasionally as topics of interest to other fiber artists and weavers inspire me.  Thank you for visiting! 

Diane